public program

Member Games - Bug Run

Client:

Lawrence Hall of Science - Member Services

The Challenge:

The TechHive was asked to host an event for the First Annual Member Games, a special public program at exclusive to members of the Lawrence Hall of Science.

Our Solution:

We created a two-player game built using cardboard components and Scratch programming. In order to complete the “Bug Run,” teams of two would have to work together to navigate a digital insect through a winding racetrack. The best times were recorded on the leaderboard.

Results:

The Bug Run was a highlight of the Member Games and TechHive was invited back as designers and facilitators of future Member Game events! Our exit poll indicated that participants enjoyed the game and liked interacting with TechHive teens. The Member Games proved that simple open tools like Scratch and cardboard could be combined to create engaging user experiences.

Lunar Xprize Event

Client:

Lawrence Hall of Science - Public Science Center

The Challenge:

The Public Science Center wanted a public program to coincide the release of their new planetarium show from Google Lunar Xprize. The public program would be showcasing the new planetarium show and the Moonbots-In-A-Box kit.

Our Solution:

We created a public program called Moon Missions, which challenged visitors to collect stamps at the five stations throughout the museum floor, including the Moonbots-In-A-Box challenge. We also created a new exhibit prototype called "Robot Basic Training" which allowed for three visitors at a time to learn to drive the moonbots by playing a multiplayer game.

Results:

Leading up to the event over consecutive weekends, TechHive interns learned teamwork, how to test prototypes with visitors, made robot mazes, and wrote and debug computer programs. The culminating event was featured on NBC news. The stamp-passport is now a practice used in other public programs.

Math on a Sphere

Client:

Lawrence Hall of Science - Center for Technology Innovation

The Challenge:

Math on a Sphere project needed to test the coding platform in a public programs format to be used for museums. An open question was whether museum visitors could be engaged in learning how to code and learn some 3D geometry.

Our Solution:

A program called "Haunted Math" was created to coincide with the Halloween season. A giant spherical projection surfaced (Science on a Sphere) was used to share different designs that visitors could create. Visitors made different kinds of ghouls, cats, and pumpkins by coding on laptops, while other visitors drew onto projections of their faces onto orange balloons.

Results:

Visitors celebrated the afternoon at the science center designing digital and physical objects while learning math, coding, and 3D geometry. Families with kids as young as 6-years old enjoyed seeing their 3D geometric designs projected onto a large spherical sphere while a "DJ" announced each design to share it.